Beginner Hunting 101

Hunting is difficult when you’re just beginning, especially if you don’t have relatives or friends who are hunters. Before you start focusing on all the cool hunting gear you’re going to wear, you’ll have to sift through the not so fun aspects of hunting first. Once you overcome all the initial paperwork and the overwhelming sensation of starting a new hobby, you will be able to focus on mastering your hunting skills. 

Learn the Different Types of Hunting 

There are several types of hunting you can do, ranging from hunting for small game to big game. Some weapons you can legally use for hunting are rifles and crossbows. Animals that can be hunted are known as “game.” Here are different types of animals that hunters usually go for: 

  • Big game hunting: deer, elk, caribou, bear, boar, and bison.
  • Small game hunting: rabbits, squirrels, raccoons, and skunks. 
  • Predator hunting: mountain lions, wolves, and coyotes. 
  • Waterfowl hunting: duck, geese, and swan. 
  • Furbearers hunting: pin marten, bobcat, foxes, and beavers. 

Get Your Hunter Safety Card 

Before you can legally go on a hunt, you’ll need to earn your hunter safety card. To be eligible for this card, you must complete a hunter safety course. This certification is proof that you have successfully completed the course, and it is valid in all states that require a hunter safety card to hunt. Best of all, you can complete the course online and at your own pace. 

Invest in Your Gear

To be the most successful hunter you can be, you’ll have to invest in adequate hunting gear such as a backpack, boots, deer and elk calls, scent killer, binoculars, rangefinders, and your weapon of choice. When selecting a backpack, ensure that your pack is of quality material because you will depend on your backpack for mostly everything. Sturdy backpacks are a must, and make sure that you don’t have to constantly adjust the straps. Invest in a comfortable pair of hunting boots to combat the looming threat of blisters and cold weather. Boots should be the first piece of gear you invest in because they will make or break your hunt. 

Deer and elk calls are of the essence, but it’s not enough to just own them. You’ll have to practice your call to perfection before you go on a hunt. Scent killers are crucial because you must mask your scent as to not scare away prey. Binoculars will help you spot deer that are fields away, and you’ll be able to scope out terrain if you are at a high altitude. Rangefinders determine the distance of your target. Although you probably have a weapon of preference in mind, stick to rifle hunting because it is easier to grasp than bow hunting when you’re a beginner. 

Practice Makes Perfect

It’s unrealistic to expect a perfect hunt on your first try. The first months or even years of hunting are dependent on your observations. Give yourself time to observe the animal you are trying to hunt and to get to know the terrain you are interested in hunting in. Experienced hunters will tell you that each hunt is different and that many of your hunts will be misses. There will be mistakes that you can’t always account for, so cut yourself some slack. 

If you’re a beginner who needs the assistance of seasoned hunters, contact R & K Hunting today to book your first hunting trip.